World Red Cross and Red Crescent Day

World Red Cross and Red Crescent Day is an annual celebration of the principles of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement. World Red Cross Red Crescent Day is celebrated on 8 May each year. This date is the anniversary of the birth of Jean-Henry Dunant, who was born on 8 May 1828. He was the founder of International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and the recipient of the first Nobel Peace Prize.


The idea for an “annual action that could take hold in the whole world … that would be a major contribution to peace” was introduced just after World War I. This initiative, known as the “Red Cross Truce”, was studied by an International Commission established at the 14th International Conference of the Red Cross. Its report, presented to the 15th International Conference of the Red Cross in Tokyo in 1934, was approved. It was only after World War II, in 1946, that the Tokyo proposal was studied by the League of Red Cross Societies (LRCS), renamed the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) in 1991. Two years later, having considered the principles of the truce and its applicability across different regions of the world, the proposal of an annual International Red Cross Day was adopted and the first Red Cross Day was celebrated on 8 May 1948. The official title of the day changed over time, and became “World Red Cross and Red Crescent Day” in 1984.

The Chinese government abandons Windows and “Western” PCs: space for Linux

Over the next two years China will take care of nearly 50 million PCs used in government agencies with “non-foreigners” that can be maintained nationwide. This also involves the abandonment of Windows in favor of Linux, to an extent aimed at cutting any possible dependence on US realities for everything related to the operation of the state machine.

This is a measure that actually comes “from afar”, with the Chinese government over the last decade trying to encourage the adoption of local hardware and software as much as possible, including hiring a company to monitor local suppliers in the development of sensitive components and services for the operation of government information systems.

A move that could have quite severe effects on the reality as Dell and HP, for which the supply and assistance of a government reality is an important part of their turnover. Conversely, Lenovo could have the opportunity to snatch significant market share from US competitors.

However, there are some components that are fundamental for certain purposes and for which there is still no “made in China” alternative. Chinese PC system manufacturers will still rely on Western components – for example, processors and GPUs – to be able to build their machines.

It is similar that special permits will continue to exist for some specific categories, such as state media and cybersecurity agencies, because they can continue to source foreign technology, even if there is no real future in the future for a squeeze for these particular cases as well.