21th September (’22): International Day of Peace

The International Day of Peace, also officially known as World Peace Day, is a United Nations-sanctioned holiday observed annually on 21 September. It is dedicated to world peace, and specifically the absence of war and violence, such as might be occasioned by a temporary ceasefire in a combat zone for humanitarian aid access. The day was first celebrated in 1981 and is kept by many nations, political groups, military groups, and people.

To inaugurate the day, the United Nations Peace Bell is rung at UN Headquarters (in New York City). The bell is cast from coins donated by children from all continents except Africa, and was a gift from the United Nations Association of Japan, as “a reminder of the human cost of war”; the inscription on its side reads, “Long live absolute world peace”.

In recent years, a searchable map of events has been published at un.org.

21th September ’22: Independence Day [Malta]

Independence Day (Maltese: Jum l-Indipendenza) is one of the five national holidays in Malta. It celebrates the day the country gained independence from the United Kingdom on 21 September 1964. Throughout its existence, Malta had a long and complex history which resulted in the island being ruled by a plethora of foreign rulers. Such rulers include the likes of the “Phoenicians, Romans, Greeks, Arabs, Normans, Sicilians, Swabians, Aragonese, Hospitallers, French, and British”. Malta’s final ruler, Britain, granted Malta self-governance after Malta’s brave resistance to the Axis powers and loyalty to Britain during World War II, which did allow for the movement for independence to grow more in popularity. Malta attained independence from the British Empire and joined the Commonwealth of Nations in 1964 and declared itself a republic a decade later, known as Republic Day.


Malta has been an area of interest, for its strategic location in the Mediterranean Sea, since classical times. The island allowed for great international trade and a militarily strategic location, the island was wonderful for navies to stop and rest and it was a great base for military assaults from the air and the sea. The island’s longest ruler was the Knights of St. John, who controlled the island for 250 years. The Knights lost their control of the island after an invasion by French forces led by Napoleon. Napoleon’s fleet was en route to invade Egypt and beyond, but needed a place to rest beforehand. Malta refused Napoleon’s request to harbour at its islands, but he was not going to let his invasion fail at the fault of the small island-state so he invaded and seized control of the island. While Malta might have been taken through force, the French did not treat them wrongly. France established many reforms that reflected that of the French Revolution, such as ending the remaining feudalistic policies, building and founding many schools, and abolishing slavery. Despite this, the people of Malta saw those policies as excessive for the locals were “largely dominated by [and loyal to] two institutions: the aristocracy and the Church.” The Maltese people revolted against the French in response to the policies enacted by France in the occupation of 1799. The French had also been plundering art and national treasures belonging to Malta and taking them back to France, such as the sword belonging to Grandmaster Jean Parisot de la Vallette. During this time, the French had been at war with the British, hence why Napoleon was headed for British-owned Egypt. So when the Maltese resistance attempted to retake their capital of Valletta and failed, they turned to Britain for help. Britain accepted Malta’s plea for help since France was Britain’s nemesis. With famous Admiral Lord Nelson, British forces blockaded the island and took it in 1800. Britain incorporated Malta into their empire, and in 1869, Malta would become famous for its use as a halfway stop between British Gibraltar and the newly opened Suez Canal. The island would then be built up as a fortress and made into the home the British Mediterranean fleet.

A century later would have the Second World War occur. Being the home of the British fleet in the Mediterranean, the Axis powers would try repeatedly to either destroy or control the island. This devastated Malta, but the island never gave in. Their stern resistance against the Nazis and Fascist Italians was rewarded by the British, who both gave the people of Malta the George Cross and promised to give the Maltese people independence. A small amount of local rule was given in 1947, though it wasn’t until 21 September 1964 that full independence came. Malta became a republic a decade later and British forces finally left the country after the defence treaty expired on 31 March 1979, which is celebrated as “Freedom Day”.

♬ Purple Disco Machine, Sophie and the Giants – IN THE DARK

Purple Disco Machine's new single is out. The song came out just today, a few days ago ...

LYRICS
I got lost in the wilderness
I thought I was surely falling apart
The pain you caused cut so deep
Truly was a work of art

I don’t care what they say, I’m gonna do it anyway
(Oh, oh)
It’s the only thing I see, always staring back at me
(Oh)

I’ve been left in the dark, standing cold in the night
Memories of your taste, I’ve been holding on tight
Falling apart and I’m living a lie
All of this time I’ve been loving a liar

Pulled me in with your words so sweet
Every time I ignore the sign
Redemption’s mine on the day I leave
Falling for you was my only crime

I don’t care what they say, I’m gonna do it anyway
(Oh, oh)
It’s the only thing I see, always staring back at me
(Oh)

I’ve been left in the dark, standing cold in the night
Memories of your taste, I’ve been holding on tight
Falling apart and I’m living a lie
All of this time I’ve been loving a liar

Ooh
Am I going under?
Ooh
Should my heart surrender?
Ooh
Am I going under?
Ooh
Should my heart surrender?

(Am I going under?)
(Should this heart surrender?)
Ooh
Am I going under?
Ooh

I’ve been left in the dark, standing cold in the night
Memories of your taste, I’ve been holding on tight
Falling apart and I’m living a lie
All of this time I’ve been loving a liar

Ooh
Am I going under?
Ooh
Should my heart surrender?
Ooh
Am I going under?
Ooh
Should my heart surrender?

American Music Awards 2021: The full winner’s list

The American Music Awards were presented Sunday 21th November in Los Angeles at the Microsoft Theater. The full list of nominees follows.

Here there is the list of Winners

Artist of the Year: BTS
New Artist of the Year: Olivia Rodrigo
Collaboration of the Year: Kiss Me More di Doja Cat e SZA
Favorite Trending Song: Body di Megan Thee Stallion
Favorite Music Video: Montero di Lil Nas X

Favorite Male Pop Artist: Ed Sheeran
Favorite Female Pop Artist: Taylow Swift
Favorite Pop Duo or Group: BTS
Favorite Pop Album: evermore di Taylor Swift
Favorite Pop Song: Butter dei BTS

Favorite Male Country Artist: Luke Bryan
Favorite Female Country Artist: Carrie Underwood
Favorite Country Duo or Group: Dan + Shay
Favorite Country Album: Goldmine di Gabby Barrett
Favorite Country Song: The Good Ones di Gabby Barrett

Favorite Male Hip Hop Artist: Drake
Favorite Female Hip Hop Artist: Megan Thee Stallion
Favorite Hip Hop Song: Up di Cardi B

Favorite Male R&B Artist: The Weeknd
Favorite Female R&B Artist: Doja Cat
Favorite R&B Album: Planet Her di Doja Cat
Favorite R&B Song: Leave the Door Open dei Silk Sonic

Favorite Male Latin Artist: Bad Bunny
Favorite Female Latin Artist: Becky G
Favorite Latin Duo or Group: Banda MS de Sergio Lizarraga
Favorite Latin Album: El ultimo tour del mundo di Bad Bunny
Favorite Latin Song: telepatia di Kali Uchis

Favorite Rock Artist: Machine Gun Kelly
Favorite Inspirational Artist: Carrie Underwood
Favorite Gospel Artist: Kanye West
Favorite Dance/Electronic Artist: Marshmello

Trump launches his social network: it will be called TRUTH and will challenge Big Tech

Former US President Donald Trump unveiled the new social platform that was announced several months ago as an alternative to the social networks from which he was removed for his involvement in the January 6, 2021 attack on the US Congress. calls TRUTH Social (“truth” means “truth”), it will arrive next year and will replace the blog with which Trump had briefly returned to be heard online. In a statement released Wednesday, Trump said he created TRUTH Social “to oppose the tyranny of Big Tech companies” and “to fight them,” arguing that the goal of the Trump Media and Technology Group (TMTG) – the company that has developed – both “to give a voice to everyone”. “We live in a world where the Taliban have a large presence on Twitter, yet your favorite American president has been silenced. This is unacceptable ».

After January 6, all the major social platforms, including Facebook and Twitter, had suspended or blocked Trump’s profiles, accusing him of inciting their supporters to carry out the assault on Congress, where the certification was being certified. election victory of President Joe Biden. Trump had never acknowledged the defeat and according to the companies that manage the main social networks had violated the guidelines of the platforms, which prohibit sharing content that promotes violence and fake news.

Trump had also been subjected to an impeachment trial accused of fomenting the attack on Congress: then he was acquitted, thanks to the votes of the Republicans.

The first tests on TRUTH Social will be carried out in November and the platform will be ready by the first months of 2022; later it should also offer news, podcasts, entertainment programs and a subscription service for video on demand. The resources for its realization come from the merger between TMTG and another company, the Digital World Acquisition Corp, which in recent months has raised 294 million dollars from various investors (it is not said, however, that all investors will remain in the deal. , and Digital World’s equity may shrink).

21 October (2021): Trafalgar Day [United Kingdom]

Trafalgar Day is the celebration of the victory won by the Royal Navy, commanded by Vice-Admiral Horatio Nelson, over the combined French and Spanish fleets at the Battle of Trafalgar on 21 October 1805.

The formation of the Navy League in 1894 gave added impetus to the movement to recognise Nelson’s legacy, and grand celebrations were held in Trafalgar Square in London on Trafalgar Day, 1896. It was commemorated by parades, dinners and other events throughout much of the British Empire in the 19th century and early 20th century. It continues to be celebrated by navies of the Commonwealth of Nations. Its public celebration declined after the end of World War I in 1918. The massive casualties and upheaval had changed the general public perception of war as a source of glorious victories to a more sombre view of it as a tragedy, for which the newly instituted Armistice Day on 11 November was created. However, Trafalgar Day was still marked as a public day each year. Around 1993, it was rumoured that John Major‘s government might make it a public holiday in place of May Day, and this plan was revived in the 2011 Tourism Strategy created by the then coalition government.

The year 2005 was the bicentennial of the Battle of Trafalgar, and the Royal Navy led Trafalgar 200 celebrations. The 2005 International Fleet Review held off Spithead in the Solent on 28 June was the first since 1999 and the largest since Her Majesty The Queen’s 1977 Silver Jubilee.

On 21 October each year the commissioned officers of the Royal Navy celebrate the victory at the Battle of Trafalgar by holding a Trafalgar Night dinner in the Officer’s Mess.

At a Trafalgar Night banquet or dinner, a speech is usually made by a guest of honour who ends it with a toast to “The Immortal Memory …” (The rest of the wording of the toast vary depending on what is said in the speech). On 21 October 2005 (the 200th anniversary), at such a dinner the traditional toast was given by Queen Elizabeth II:”The Immortal Memory of Lord Nelson and those who fell with him”

Such dinners also occur each year on or around 21 October in locations other than Royal Navy ships.

The Royal Naval Museum in Portsmouth hold a “Trafalgar Night Dinner” each year on a date close to 21 October.

The British ambassador in Washington hosts such a dinner at which the guest of honour may be a senior officer in the United States Navy.

The Lord Mayor of Birmingham lays a wreath at Birmingham’s statue of Lord Nelson on Trafalgar Day 2007.

Sea Cadet Corps in the United Kingdom hold a youth cadet parade known as the National Trafalgar Day Parade on Trafalgar Square each year. The parade is formed with a platoon from each area, a guard and a massed band. This is held on the closest Sunday to 21 October. Units and Districts from around the country celebrate this day – usually with a town parade.

Birmingham celebrates the anniversary with a ceremony at the statue of Lord Nelson – the oldest such statue in the United Kingdom – in the Bull Ring. The ceremony is led by the Lord Mayor of Birmingham and involves men and women of HMS Forward, Sea Cadet units from across the West Midlands and various civic organisations, including The Nelson Society and The Birmingham Civic Society. Afterwards representatives of naval and civic organisations lay wreaths and a parade marches off to Victoria Square, the public square in front of the seat of local government, where the Lord Mayor takes the salute.

Another aspect of the Birmingham celebration is that the statue is regaled with swags of laurel and flowers, possibly due to its location by the wholesale flower markets of the city. This tradition, marked through most of the nineteenth century, was revived in 2004. Flags fly from the Nelson Monument on Calton Hill in Edinburgh on Trafalgar Day 2013

In Edinburgh, citizens commissioned the Nelson Monument on Calton Hill in memory of Admiral Lord Nelson. Weather permitting, the Trafalgar flag signal “England expects that every man will do his duty” is flown on Trafalgar Day. Looking like a tall stone telescope, the Nelson Monument contains a time ball which drops at 1 o’clock daily.

The village of Dervock in County Antrim (Northern Ireland) has the only known memorial which takes the form of a stained-glass window depicting Admiral Lord Nelson minutes before he was killed on board HMS Victory in 1805. It is believed that this is the only memorial on the island, Nelson’s pillar in Dublin (the earliest memorial to Admiral Nelson) having been destroyed in 1966, and in 2015 residents organised their first ever “Trafalgar Day”.

In Gibraltar, the Trafalgar Day service takes place at the Trafalgar Cemetery, where the senior Naval Commander reads an extract from the Gibraltar Chronicle newspaper, the first periodical to report on the battle. Some sailors died in Gibraltar of wounds received at Trafalgar; they are buried in Gibraltar. HMS Victory, with Nelson’s body on board, underwent repairs in Gibraltar prior to sailing for Britain.

In the Isle of ManJohn Quilliam, 1st Lieutenant of HMS Victory in 1805, is buried in the graveyard of Kirk Arbory, Ballabeg. An annual parade and church service takes place on Trafalgar Day.

21th March: International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination

International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination
International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination

The International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination is observed annually on 21 March. On that day, in 1960, police opened fire and killed 69 people at a peaceful demonstration in Sharpeville, South Africa, against the apartheid pass laws. Proclaiming the day in 1966, the United Nations General Assembly called on the international community to redouble its efforts to eliminate all forms of racial discrimination.

In South Africa, Human Rights Day is a public holiday celebrated on 21 March each year. The day commemorates the lives of those who died to fight for democracy and equal human rights for all in South Africa during apartheid, an institutionally racist system built upon racial discrimination. The Sharpeville Massacre on 21 March 1960 is the particular reference day for this public holiday.