18th May (’22): International Museum Day

International Museum Day (IMD) is an international day held annually on or around 18 May, coordinated by the International Council of Museums (ICOM). The event highlights a specific theme which changes every year reflecting a relevant theme or issue facing museums internationally.

IMD provides the opportunity for museum professionals to meet the public and alert them as to the challenges that museums face, and raise public awareness on the role museums play in the development of society. It also promotes dialogue between museum professionals.

The first International Museum Day took place in 1977, coordinated by ICOM. IMD was established following the adoption of a resolution by ICOM to create an annual event “with the aim of further unifying the creative aspirations and efforts of museums and drawing the attention of the world public to their activity.

Each year, museum internationally are invited to participate in IMD to promote the role of museums around in the world. They do so through events and activities related to the annual theme. An annual theme for the event was first adopted in 1992. An international poster from ICOM was first developed in 1997, and in that year was adapted by 28 countries. In 2009, IMD attracted the participation of 20,000 museums hosting events in more than 90 countries. In 2010, 98 countries participated in the celebration, with 100 countries in 2011, and 30,000 museums in 129 countries in 2012. In 2011, the official IMD poster was translated into 37 languages. By 2014, 35,000 museums from 140 countries were taking part in IMD.

9th May (’22): Victory Day (Russia and many eastern countries)

Victory Day] is a holiday that commemorates the victory over Nazi Germany in 1945. It was first inaugurated in the 15 republics of the Soviet Union, following the signing of the German Instrument of Surrender late in the evening on 8 May 1945 (after midnight, thus on 9 May Moscow Time). The Soviet government announced the victory early on 9 May after the signing ceremony in Berlin. Although the official inauguration occurred in 1945, the holiday became a non-labor day only in 1965, and only in certain Soviet republics.

In East Germany, 8 May was observed as Liberation Day from 1950 to 1966, and was celebrated again on the 40th anniversary in 1985. In 1967, a Soviet-style “Victory Day” was celebrated on 8 May. Since 2002, the German state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern has observed a commemoration day known as the Day of Liberation from National Socialism, and the End of the Second World War.

The Russian Federation has officially recognized 9 May since its formation in 1991 and considers it a non-working holiday even if it falls on a weekend (in which case any following Monday will be a non-working holiday). The holiday was similarly celebrated there while the country was part of the Soviet Union. Most other countries in Europe observe Victory in Europe Day (often abbreviated to VE Day, or V-E Day), 8 May, as a national remembrance or victory day.

World Red Cross and Red Crescent Day

World Red Cross and Red Crescent Day is an annual celebration of the principles of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement. World Red Cross Red Crescent Day is celebrated on 8 May each year. This date is the anniversary of the birth of Jean-Henry Dunant, who was born on 8 May 1828. He was the founder of International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and the recipient of the first Nobel Peace Prize.


The idea for an “annual action that could take hold in the whole world … that would be a major contribution to peace” was introduced just after World War I. This initiative, known as the “Red Cross Truce”, was studied by an International Commission established at the 14th International Conference of the Red Cross. Its report, presented to the 15th International Conference of the Red Cross in Tokyo in 1934, was approved. It was only after World War II, in 1946, that the Tokyo proposal was studied by the League of Red Cross Societies (LRCS), renamed the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) in 1991. Two years later, having considered the principles of the truce and its applicability across different regions of the world, the proposal of an annual International Red Cross Day was adopted and the first Red Cross Day was celebrated on 8 May 1948. The official title of the day changed over time, and became “World Red Cross and Red Crescent Day” in 1984.

The Chinese government abandons Windows and “Western” PCs: space for Linux

Over the next two years China will take care of nearly 50 million PCs used in government agencies with “non-foreigners” that can be maintained nationwide. This also involves the abandonment of Windows in favor of Linux, to an extent aimed at cutting any possible dependence on US realities for everything related to the operation of the state machine.

This is a measure that actually comes “from afar”, with the Chinese government over the last decade trying to encourage the adoption of local hardware and software as much as possible, including hiring a company to monitor local suppliers in the development of sensitive components and services for the operation of government information systems.

A move that could have quite severe effects on the reality as Dell and HP, for which the supply and assistance of a government reality is an important part of their turnover. Conversely, Lenovo could have the opportunity to snatch significant market share from US competitors.

However, there are some components that are fundamental for certain purposes and for which there is still no “made in China” alternative. Chinese PC system manufacturers will still rely on Western components – for example, processors and GPUs – to be able to build their machines.

It is similar that special permits will continue to exist for some specific categories, such as state media and cybersecurity agencies, because they can continue to source foreign technology, even if there is no real future in the future for a squeeze for these particular cases as well.

Mourinho’s Roma in the Conference final will challenge Feyenoord

Tammy Abraham celebrated by his teammates after the 1-0 goal.

Striker Abraham’s goal gave the Giallorossi the decisive home success in the return leg of the semifinal against the foxes, after the 1-1 first leg in England. Trophy up for grabs with the Dutch of Feyenoord Delirium at the Olimpico: Roma, 31 years after the last time, returns to center the final of a European cup. Mourinho, on May 25 in Tirana, will be able to add the Conference League to his infinite showcase: between Roma and the trophy only Feyenoord remains, who in the other semifinal resisted (0-0) in another pit, that of the Velodrome of Marseille, after the 3-2 of the first leg. The return semi-final against Leicester was decided by Tammy Abraham with a header from a true center-forward after 11 minutes: then, a masterpiece of defensive strength, signed by José Mourinho. The Portuguese coach, who had left the half team against Bologna on the bench, re-proposed the best Roma, with Pellegrini and Zaniolo behind Abraham, Oliveira and Cristante in the middle and Zalewski on the left. The start was fierce: at 7 ‘, Pellegrini on a free kick engaged Schmeichel, the protagonist of a defective but effective save, then, on the following corner beaten by Pellegrini himself, Smalling sent a high header. Another corner in the 11th minute, but this time a winner: cross from the captain and header under the crossbar by Abraham, who ruled Ricardo Pereira scoring the ninth goal in the Conference League (fifth European game to score at the Olimpico) and the 25th ° overall of his season. Roma tried to exploit the rampant enthusiasm of the Olimpico and a bit of bewilderment by the Foxes: another insertion by Pellegrini and a response in bagher by Schmeichel. Leicester, on 13 ‘looked for the door with Dewsbury-Hall, had time to raise the center of gravity, but the three in front had to collide with a super Smalling who led a defense in which Mancini, in the final of first, was got his twentieth yellow card of the season for a savage on Dewsbury-Hall.

3th May (’22): World Press Freedom Day

The United Nations General Assembly declared May 3 to be World Press Freedom Day or just World Press Day, observed to raise awareness of the importance of freedom of the press and remind governments of their duty to respect and uphold the right to freedom of expression enshrined under Article 19 of the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights and marking the anniversary of the Windhoek Declaration, a statement of free press principles put together by African newspaper journalists in Windhoek in 1991.

n 2018, a conference sponsored by the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations was canceled. In 2018, several news organizations joined for an ad campaign. Slain journalists in Kabul were remembered.

UNESCO marks World Press Freedom Day by conferring the UNESCO/Guillermo Cano World Press Freedom Prize on a deserving individual, organisation or institution that has made an outstanding contribution to the defence and/or promotion of press freedom anywhere in the world, especially when this has been achieved in the face of danger. Created in 1997, the prize is awarded on the recommendation of an independent jury of 14 news professionals. Names are submitted by regional and international non-governmental organisations working for press freedom, and by UNESCO member states.The Prize is named in honour of Guillermo Cano Isaza, a Colombian journalist who was assassinated in front of the offices of his newspaper, El Espectador, in Bogotá, on 17 December 1986. Cano’s writings had offended Colombia’s powerful drug barons.

UNESCO also marks World Press Freedom Day each year by bringing together media professionals, press freedom organisations and UN agencies to assess the state of press freedom worldwide and discuss solutions for addressing challenges. Each conference is centred on a theme related to press freedom, including good governance, media coverage of terrorism, impunity and the role of media in post-conflict countries