Sabaudia (Latina) [3] – PHOTO October

other photos of sabaudia .. these photos in particular show the lake near the coast. The town, as you can see, can boast of a lot of greenery, even if for most of the year the heat and humidity make the area full of insects. The city, founded by Mussolini, has wide streets, designed and engineered according to the canons of that time. Although it was October (and especially the small town that does not boast a great tourism) I was able to see some visitor-tourists.

♬ Colapesce, DiMartino – Musica leggerissima

TESTO (Lyric)

Se fosse un’orchestra a parlare per noi
Sarebbe più facile cantarsi un addio
Diventare adulti sarebbe un crescendo
Di violini e guai
I tamburi annunciano un temporale
Il maestro è andato via
Metti un po’ di musica leggera
Perché ho voglia di niente
Anzi leggerissima
Parole senza mistero
Allegre ma non troppo
Metti un po’ di musica leggera
Nel silenzio assordante
Per non cadere dentro al buco nero
Che sta ad un passo da noi, da noi
Più o meno

Se bastasse un concerto per far nascere un fiore
Tra i palazzi distrutti dalle bombe nemiche
Nel nome di un Dio
Che non viene fuori col temporale
Il maestro è andato via
Metti un po’ di musica leggera
Perché ho voglia di niente
Anzi leggerissima
Parole senza mistero
Allegre ma non troppo
Metti un po’ di musica leggera
Nel silenzio assordante
Per non cadere dentro al buco nero
Che sta ad un passo da noi, da noi
Più o meno

Rimane in sottofondo
Dentro ai supermercati
La cantano i soldati
I figli alcolizzati
I preti progressisti
La senti nei quartieri
Assolati
Che rimbomba leggera
Si annida nei pensieri
In palestra
Tiene in piedi una festa
Anche di merda
Ripensi alla tua vita
Alle cose che hai lasciato
Cadere nello spazio
Della tua indifferenza
Animale
Metti un po’ di musica leggera
Perché ho voglia di niente
Anzi leggerissima
Parole senza mistero
Allegre ma non troppo
Metti un po’ di musica leggera
Nel silenzio assordante
Per non cadere dentro al buco nero
Che sta ad un passo da noi, da noi
Più o meno

’21-04-13° PHOTOS OF GAMBATESA [Molise, Italy]

Gambatesa (Iammatése in Molise) is an Italian town of 1 359 inhabitants in the province of Campobasso, in Molise. It is about 30 kilometers east from the capital and about 10 kilometers from the border between Molise and Puglia. Located on the hill and surrounded by greenery, it offers a wide view of the Occhito lake; it has an extension of 43 km². Probably the center existed in Roman times, even if it developed as a castle of the Lombards in the eighth century. The name comes from a physical defect of the first owner. The castle developed in the Angevin period in the thirteenth century, under the control of Riccardo Pietravalle, favorite of Roberto D’Angiò. In 1399 Ladislao di Durazzo granted the fief to the Galluccio family of Naples. In the 15th century it passed to Andrea di Capua, hence the name of the castle. The Caracciolo family was the last dynasty to have feudal control of Gambatesa, until 1806. Subsequently, with the establishment of the Molise region, the center became part of the Campobasso state property. Traditions and folklore The “Maitunate” festival, in addition to being the oldest New Year in Molise, is the oldest and most characteristic popular event in Gambatesa, which involves the entire population. It takes place from the evening of December 31st to the evening of January 1st of each year, and has as its stage the squares, streets, alleys and thresholds of the houses of friends, relatives and authorities.

ITALY: new government and Slight fades of the ‘5 star movement’

The new Italian prime minister (premier) Mario Draghi

Probably most of the readers will not know Italian politics, both because it is slightly of interest at an international level and because the newspapers speak little about it. What has happened in recent weeks is quite serious: the previous government was brought down by opening a crisis in the forces of the majority of the parliament.

The causes of the fall of the government are many but the main one is that Matteo Renzi who formed his party in 2019 with many parliamentarians (but who currently has only 2% of votes in the polls) managed not to get the absolute majority to the government With you. In fact, in the first days of February, by voting for confidence in the Senate, Giuseppe Conte managed to snatch a narrow relative majority. And this could also allow to govern by avoiding resigning but it would probably have led to a stagnation in the country.

The president of the republic, who in these cases (when the minister of the council is vacant) has the maximum power and has decided to appoint Draghi, a prominent figure with a unique curriculum in the world. He was president of the bank of Italy and also president of the European central bank, directing precisely in the most crucial years, that is, after the world crisis of 2008-2009. Obviously it was not only the curriculum that motivated the choice, but also the fact that coming from a purely pro-European environment he would have reconciled agreements with the parties that had opened the crisis, despite the fact that there are many parties that do not accept this policy such as the ‘Five-Star movement’. , ‘The League’ and ‘Brothers of Italy’.

The one who is losing the most is the five-star movement, which obviously was the majority party and after having built the government twice, first with Salvini’s right and then with Zingaretti’s left, we see not only losing ministries but also to lose the consensus because many would have liked the movement to have abstained in the vote of confidence in Draghi. Consultations with the new premier were made by all parties but obviously since the primary requirement was to form the government the demands from the leaders were minimal. Beppe Grillo, leader of the 5 stars is to form a ministry for ecological transition but judging by the elected minister, few seem satisfied. In fact, one of the reasons that forced the five stars to support the new government was the risk of losing what has been done up to now. There is no doubt that the movement has done many things in these two and a half years of its term. The citizenship income, the one hundred share for the pension, the law sweeps corrupt, the abolition of the statute of limitations in the judicial reform, and also the competitions in public school.

However, what surprised everyone was the presence in the new government of the ministers of ‘Forza Italia’ (Berlusconi). Some already envisaged this because it was Berlusconi himself who included Mario Draghi at the helm of the European Central Bank. But it is obviously a return to the past, above all because the ministers inserted in the government have been part of the previous legislatures, with not exciting results. If the government lasts until the end of the mandate (i.e. 2023) it will still be a great result for Draghi’s team because almost everyone speculates that the current government will also hold up to be able to elect the president of the republic in the white semester (period in which it is not possible to dissolve your houses of parliament). I doubt that this government will revolutionize the decisions regarding the covid, but it will “limit itself” to better manage the money of the recovery plan, which certainly is coveted by many political parties. It is obvious that a worsening of infections or a delay in vaccination will not help the new government, which will be forced to make decisions based on the evolution of the epidemic. Although it is noted that this government is currently less criticized than the previous one, which in my view has worked miracles, above all by being the first country in the world to have to apply a tough lockdown. Whatever happens these last two years of legislature, I hope that the movement does not dissolve, because new dissidents are starting to emerge within the movement: not everyone agrees to support this government, which is more and more like caste and strong powers. ..

Photo of Snowfall (13th February) – Campobasso [Italy]

The disturbance from Russia is crossing a large part of the Italian peninsula. And in Campobasso this morning it snowed, whitening and snowing the streets of the city. It is now increasingly rare to see a snowfall, while until the last decade snowfalls were very common in winter, Walking around the city was a quite unique event because not only the crowding of the city center was decimated by the pandemic and from various precautionary measures, but also for snow. There were few cars on the streets, while on normal Saturdays there is a heavy traffic of cars.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gabrieleromano/

📸 PHOTOS of Castelbottaccio (CB) [Molise] – Italy

Castelbottaccio stands on a hill to the hydrographic left of the Biferno river, the most important in the province. From its highest point, Colle Iannone (717 meters above sea level), it is possible to see the surrounding landscape as far as the Abruzzo region and the sea and, on clear days, the Tremiti islands (about 90 km away). Among the countryside it is easy to find farms and huts, a clear reference to the peasant soul of the country. Furthermore, a few km away there is the Celano-Foggia route(sheep track), which joins the summer pastures in Abruzzo to the winter ones in Puglia

Victory Square
Initially known as the town hall square, it was so named in 1965, it is the social center of the town. Adjacent to the church of San Rocco. In the center of the square there is a fountain that portrays the symbol of the town, a barrel surmounted by the walls of the ‘civitas’. Over the years, work has been carried out to modify the original shape of the square, which now looks like in the photo.

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Church of Santa Maria delle Grazie
It is the most important church in the town, a few steps from the baronial palace. The church belongs to the 10th century and has three naves. Despite its Norman origins, currently, after a series of important restorations, the whole body is of Baroque matrix. Along the two side aisles there are small cells where we find several statues. At the end of the left aisle there is an imposing wrought iron gate. There is an imposing square bell tower, where 4 bells are housed. The church preserves the three important statues of Saint Lucia (year 1841 – wooden sculpture by Crescenzo Ranallo di Oratino), of the Virgin of Grace (year 1694 – wooden sculpture by Giacomo Colombo) and of Saint Joseph (year 1780 – wooden sculpture by Silverio Giovannitti by Oratino).

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📸 PHOTOS of Lucito (CB) [Molise] – Italy

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Lucito is an Italian town of 655 inhabitants in the province of Campobasso, in Molise.

The name of the town, Lucito, could derive from the Latin term lucus, which means “sacred wood”, or from the Latin name Lucius. According to others, it derives instead from “elceto” (or “saliceto”), vulgarly become “liceto” (or “saluceto”), and therefore “Luceto”.

The foundation of Lucito is traced back to the Lombard period. The town was a fiefdom of Gionata di Balbano in 1188, then passed to the Caracciolos and later to the Di Sangro. From the Di Sangro it passed to the Piscicelli, who due to debts were forced to auction off their fiefs. The fiefdom of Lucito was purchased in 1670 by the Neapolitan nobleman Francesco Capecelatro, former lord of Nevano, who thus became the Marquis of Lucito.

Church of San Nicola di Bari
It was built in the 14th century on the remains of a Benedictine monastery dedicated to Santa Maria al Plasinium. With the earthquake of 1456 it suffered damage and the church was re-consecrated in Renaissance style in 1566.

In 1805 a new great earthquake shook Molise and the church was completely restored in 1897.

The merit of the neoclassical church is the frescoed chapel on the right with arches. The church is distributed in three naves. The bell tower belongs to the Renaissance and is decorated with an onion spire.

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Capecelatro Palace
It was originally the medieval castle. The Capecelatro family bought the castle in 1655, transforming the structure into a baronial residence. The rectangular building has two lower floors and a noble one, with the ancient coats of arms attached to the exterior. The ramparts and the two access portals are preserved.

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