♬ Sophie and the Giants – We Own The Night

LYRIC

I feel the tension between you and me (Me)
It’s like a cosmic reaction that we won’t fight
Lose inhibitions, come closer to me (Closer to me)
Drunk on self-esteem, ’cause I don’t wanna think twice (Twice)

Let’s get dramatic tearin’ up this room (Tearin’ up this room)
What comes unquestioned like we always do
Oh-oh-oh, breaking rules
But we’re no good at nothing else

So let’s get drunk, fall in love
I don’t wanna be alone
Keep dancing, keep dancing
Like we own the night
So what if you’re not who I’m takin’ home?
Let’s just keep dancing, keep dancing
Like we own the night

Na-na-na-na-na-na
Na-na-na-na-na-na
Na-na-na-na-na-na, na-na, na, na
Na-na-na-na-na-na
Na-na-na-na-na-na
Na-na-na-na-na-na, na-na, na, na
(Like we own the night)

Move with the motion, keep breathin’ with me (Me)
Yeah, our bodies magnetic when we’re alone (Na-na-na)
Wish we could just live right now on repeat (Repeat)
It’s so bitter sweet, yeah, losin’ my mind

Let’s get dramatic tearin’ up this room (Tearin’ up this room)
What comes unquestioned like we always do
Oh-oh-oh, breaking rules
But we’re no good at nothing else

So let’s get drunk, fall in love
I don’t wanna be alone
Keep dancing, keep dancing
Like we own the night
So what if you’re not who I’m takin’ home?
Let’s just keep dancing, keep dancing
Like we own the night

Na-na-na-na-na-na
Na-na-na-na-na-na
Na-na-na-na-na-na, na-na, na, na
(Like we own the night)
Na-na-na-na-na-na
Na-na-na-na-na-na
Na-na-na-na-na-na, na-na, na, na
(Like we own the night)

Let’s get dramatic tearin’ up this room (Tearin’ up this room)
What comes unquestioned like we always do
Oh-oh-oh, breaking rules
But we’re no good at nothing else

So let’s get drunk, fall in love
I don’t wanna be alone
Keep dancing, keep dancing
Like we own the night
So what if you’re not who I’m takin’ home?
Let’s just keep dancing, keep dancing
Like we own the night

♬ Harry Styles – Late Night Talking

LYRIC

Things haven’t been quite the same
There’s a haze on the horizon, babe
It’s only been a couple of days
And I miss you, mm, yeah
When nothin’ really goes to plan
You stub your toe or break your camera
I’ll do everythin’ I can
To help you through
If you’re feelin’ down
I just wanna make you happier, baby
Wish I was around
I just wanna make you happier, baby
We’ve been doin’ all this late night talkin’
‘Bout anythin’ you want until the mornin’
Now you’re in my life
I can’t get you off my mind
I’ve never been a fan of change
But I’d follow you to any place
If it’s Hollywood or Bishopsgate
I’m coming too
If you’re feelin’ down
I just wanna make you happier, baby
Wish I was around
I just wanna make you happier, baby
We’ve been doin’ all this late night talkin’
‘Bout anythin’ you want until the mornin’
Now you’re in my life
I can’t get you off my mind
Can’t get you off my mind
Can’t get you off my mind (can’t get you off my mind)
I won’t even try (I won’t even try)
To get you off my mind (get you off my mind)
We’ve been doin’ all this late night talkin’
‘Bout anythin’ you want until the mornin’
Now you’re in my life
I can’t get you off my mind
Can’t get you off my mind (all this late night talkin’)
Can’t get you off my mind (all this late night talkin’)
I won’t even try (all this late night talkin’)
Can’t get you off my
All this late night talkin’

7th July (’22): Kupala Night [Poland, Russia, Belarus, Lithuania and Ukraine]

Kupala Night (Belarusian: Купалле, Polish: Noc Kupały, Russian: Иван-Купала, Ukrainian: Іван Купала), also called Ivanа-Kupala, is a traditional Slavic holiday that was originally celebrated on the shortest night of the year, which is on 21-22 or 23-24 of June (Czech Republic, Poland and Slovakia) and in Eastern Slavic countries according to traditional Julian calendar on the night between 6 to 7 July (Belarus, Russia and Ukraine). Calendar-wise, it is opposite to the winter holiday Koliada. The celebration relates to the summer solstice when nights are the shortest and includes a number of Slavic rituals. It involves herb collecting, bonfire lighting, and bathing in the river.

The name of the holiday was originally Kupala; a pagan fertility rite later adapted into the Orthodox Christian calendar by connecting it with St. John’s Day which is celebrated on 24 June. Eastern Christianity uses traditional Julian calendar which is misaligned with actual solstice; 24 June in Julian calendar falls on 7 July in more modern Gregorian calendar.

This holiday symbolizes the birth of the summer sun – Kupalo. In the IV century AD, this day was proclaimed the holiday of the birth of John the Baptist – the forerunner of Jesus Christ. As a result of the Christianization of the pagan feast the name “Kupala” got connected with the Christian “Ivan”.

The Ukrainian, Belarusian name of this holiday combines “Ivan” (Joan/Johan/John, in this case John the Baptist) and Kupala which was thought to be derived from the Slavic word for bathing, which is cognate. However, it likely stems from the proto-Slavic kump, a gathering. The two feasts could be connected by reinterpreting John’s baptizing people through full immersion in water. However, the tradition of Kupala predates Christianity. The pagan celebration was adapted and reestablished as one of the native Christian traditions intertwined with local folklore.
Many of the rites related to this holiday are connected with the role of water in fertility and ritual purification. This is due to the ancient Kupala rites. On Kupala day, young people jump over the flames of bonfires in a ritual test of bravery and faith. The failure of a couple in love to complete the jump, while holding hands, is a sign of their destined separation.

Girls may float wreaths of flowers (often lit with candles) on rivers, and attempt to gain foresight into their romantic relationship fortune from the flow patterns of the flowers on the river. Men may attempt to capture the wreaths, in the hope of capturing the interest of the woman who floated it.

There is an ancient Kupala belief that the eve of Ivan Kupala is the only time of the year when ferns bloom. Prosperity, luck, discernment, and power befall whoever finds a fern flower. Therefore, on that night, village folk roam through the forests in search of magical herbs, and especially, the elusive fern flower.

Traditionally, unmarried women, signified by the garlands in their hair, are the first to enter the forest. They are followed by young men. Therefore, the quest to find herbs and the fern flower may lead to the blooming of relationships between pairs within the forest.

Ferns are not angiosperms (flowering plants), and instead reproduce by spores; they cannot flower.

In Gogol’s story The Eve of Ivan Kupala (also called Saint John’s Eve), a young man finds the fantastical fern-flower, but is cursed by it. Gogol’s tale was adapted by Yuri Ilyenko into a film of the same name, and may have been the stimulus for Modest Mussorgsky to compose his tone poem Night on Bald Mountain.

♬ Sigala, Talia Mar – Stay the Night

LYRIC

Stay the night
Baby, we can bring the music back to life
Just you and I
Stay the night
Even if we both get lost inside the lights
We’ll be alright
Stay the night, night, night, night
The night, night, night, night
The night, night, night
Yeah, I’ve been missing you
Feels like we’re back in July and
We’re touching down on the island
Still got that look in your eye, mm, mm
I, I, I, I, I
I feel like you just left the room
You’re right here and I’m missing you
I, I, I, I, I
I’m missing you
I’m missing you
So stay the night
Baby, we can bring the music back to life
Just you and I
Stay the night
Even if we both get lost inside the lights
We’ll be alright
So stay the night
Baby, we can bring the music back to life
Just you and I
So stay the night
Even if we both get lost inside the lights
We’ll be alright
Stay the night, night, night, night
The night, night, night, night
The night, night, night
‘Cause I’ve been missing you
Stay the night, night, night, night
The night, night, night, night
The night, night, night
Yeah, I’ve been missing you
Bring back the fire, can we just
Still stay those kids in Ibiza?
Late nights and too much tequila, mm
I, I, I, I, I
I feel like you just left the room
You’re right here and I’m missing you
I, I, I, I, I
I’m missing you
I’m missing you
So stay the night
Baby, we can bring the music back to life
Just you and I
So stay the night (the night)
Even if we both get lost inside the lights (inside the lights)
We’ll be alright
Stay the night, night, night, night
The night, night, night, night
The night, night, night (ooh)
Stay the night, night, night, night
The night, night, night, night
The night, night, night
Yeah, I’ve been missing you
Stay the night, night, night, night
The night, night, night, night
The night, night, night, night

5th November (2021) [UK]: Guy Fawkes Night

Guy Fawkes Night, also known as Guy Fawkes Day, Bonfire Night and Fireworks Night, is an annual commemoration observed on 5 November, primarily in the United Kingdom. Its history begins with the events of 5 November 1605 O.S., when Guy Fawkes, a member of the Gunpowder Plot, was arrested while guarding explosives the plotters had placed beneath the House of Lords. Celebrating the fact that King James I had survived the attempt on his life, people lit bonfires around London; and months later, the introduction of the Observance of 5th November Act enforced an annual public day of thanksgiving for the plot’s failure.

Within a few decades Gunpowder Treason Day, as it was known, became the predominant English state commemoration, but as it carried strong Protestant religious overtones it also became a focus for anti-Catholic sentiment. Puritans delivered sermons regarding the perceived dangers of popery, while during increasingly raucous celebrations common folk burnt effigies of popular hate-figures, such as the Pope. Towards the end of the 18th century reports appear of children begging for money with effigies of Guy Fawkes and 5 November gradually became known as Guy Fawkes Day, even though Fawkes was not the leading figure in the conspiracy (who was Robert Catesby). Towns such as Lewes and Guildford were in the 19th century scenes of increasingly violent class-based confrontations, fostering traditions those towns celebrate still, albeit peaceably. In the 1850s changing attitudes resulted in the toning down of much of the day’s anti-Catholic rhetoric, and the Observance of 5th November Act was repealed in 1859. Eventually the violence was dealt with, and by the 20th century Guy Fawkes Day had become an enjoyable social commemoration, although lacking much of its original focus. The present-day Guy Fawkes Night is usually celebrated at large organised events, centred on a bonfire and extravagant firework displays.

Settlers exported Guy Fawkes Night to overseas colonies, including some in North America, where it was known as Pope Day. Those festivities died out with the onset of the American Revolution. Claims that Guy Fawkes Night was a Protestant replacement for older customs such as Samhain are disputed as England had no contemporary history of bonfires compared to North Wales and Scotland.

♬ Griff – One Night

LYRIC

How long can I leave the lights in the ceiling on?
And the static from the TV keeps me company ’til I’m gone
‘Cause I rock back and forth
Reciting words that I’ve said wrong
I swear I’ve been doing fine
When I’m busy and got things going on
Oh, so girl, what you running from?Oh, maybe there’s something in the midnight hours
The midnight hours, you know
Or maybe there’s something in the dead of night
When I’m sleeping alone
Where I always see your face
God, I wish I didn’t though
Can I have one night, one night, one night
Where it’s just me alone?Is it ’cause I’ve been feeling guilty all along?
Or is it the gods just tryna tell me to move on?
‘Cause while you’re haunting me, that’s what you’ve done
Oh, so girl, what you running from?Oh, maybe there’s something in the midnight hours
The midnight hours, you know
Or maybe there’s something in the dead of night
When I’m sleeping alone
Where I always see your face
God, I wish I didn’t though
Can I have one night, one night, one night
Where it’s just me alone?So I, I know what it feels like
So I can wake up in the daylight
And my chest ain’t heavy
‘Cause you’re not there with me
Tell me when that will beOh, ’cause I rock back and forth
Reciting words that I’ve said wrong
I swear I’ve been doing fine
When I’m busy and got things going on
So what am I running from?Oh, maybe there’s something in the midnight hours
The midnight hours, you know
Or maybe there’s something in the dead of night
When I’m sleeping alone
Where I always see your face
God, I wish I didn’t though
Can I have one night, one night, one night
Where it’s just me alone?One night, one night, yeah
So can I have one night, one night, just one night
One night, one night, one night
Can I have one night, one night, just one night
Where it’s just me alone?

10th august: Saint Lawrence (falling stars)

Spinello_Aretino_001

The night of San Lorenzo (10 August) is traditionally associated with the passage of the meteor shower of the Perseids, a phenomenon popularly and erroneously called shooting stars but also poetically tears of San Lorenzo, considered evocative of the burning coals on which the saint was martyred. Indeed, in those days, the Earth’s atmosphere is traversed by a much higher number of small meteors than normal. The phenomenon is particularly visible in our latitudes as the summer sky is often clear.

Shooting-stars

Lorenzo (in Latin: Laurentius; Huesca, 225 – Rome, August 10, 258) was one of the seven deacons of Rome, where he was martyred in 258 during the persecution desired by the Roman emperor Valerian in 257. The Catholic Church venerates him as a saint .

There is little information on the life of St. Lawrence, who in the past also enjoyed notable popular devotion. It is known that he was originally from Spain and more precisely from Osca, in Aragon, at the foot of the Pyrenees.

Still young, he was sent to Zaragoza to complete his humanities and theological studies; it was here that he met the future Pope Sixtus II. He taught in what was, at the time, one of the best known study centers in the city and, among those teachers, the future pope was one of the best known and most appreciated. A friendship and mutual esteem therefore began between teacher and pupil. Later both, following a very lively migratory flow at the time, left Spain to move to Rome.

When on 30 August 257 Sisto was elected bishop of Rome, he entrusted Lorenzo with the task of archdeacon, that is, of responsible for the charitable activities in the diocese of Rome, which benefited 1500 people including the poor and widows.

At the beginning of August 258 the Emperor Valerian had issued an edict, according to which all bishops, priests and deacons were to be put to death:

The edict was carried out immediately in Rome, at the time when Daciano was prefect of the city. Surprised while celebrating the Eucharist in the catacombs of Pretestato, Pope Sixtus II was killed on August 6 along with four of his deacons, including Innocent; four days later, on 10 August, it was Lorenzo’s turn, who was 33 years old. It is not certain whether he was burned with a grill set on fire.