WhatsApp, Facebook and Instagram restart after 7 hours. How much the longest “down” in history cost

The repercussions have not only been on the nerves but also economically and politically around the world. Companies accustomed, from India to Brazil, to receiving orders and making deliveries by communicating through Facebook have suddenly stopped. Bloomberg estimates that the global economic loss was $ 160 million for every hour of digital disruption.

It took nearly seven hours to partially and slowly get back online. Not exactly a day to frame, Monday 4 October, for Mark Zuckerberg’s galaxy. First the words of Frances Haugen, the former manager who delivered internal research to lawmakers and the Wall Street Journal on how the social network manages content and risks for users. Then the downtime of all the sites and services that also involved the same Menlo Park employees with phones and badges out of order. Around midnight, a tweet from the group Zuck founded apologized for the “inconveniences.”

Even Zuckerberg himself, through his Facebook profile, apologized: «Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp and Messenger are coming back online now. I’m sorry for today’s interruption – I know how much you rely on our services to stay in touch with the people you care about, “wrote the founder of the social network par excellence. Shortly before midnight the first signs of recovery for Facebook and Instagram, while for Whatsapp only for a few seconds. As a Facebook spokesperson quoted by the New York Times reported, the services are coming back online, but he warned that it will take some time for them to stabilize. The fact remains that, as the downdetector that monitors digital disruptions reports, this is the largest breakdown ever recorded by the site.

Since shortly after 5.30 pm WhatsApp, Facebook and Instagram have not worked, or have worked in fits and starts, in various parts of the world, including Italy. And the hashtags #WhatsAppDown, #FacebookDown and #InstagramDown began to climb the twitter rankings, quickly reaching the top. Within a few minutes, the joke and irony competition also started, where Jack Dorsey also intervened.

It would be an incorrect configuration of the Facebook servers, therefore an internal error, the cause of the total downtime of the social network and of the WhatsApp and Instagram apps. This was reported by the New York Times which collected the explanation of John Graham-Cumming, chief technology officer of Cloudflare, a web infrastructure company. The premise is that computers convert websites such as Facebook.com into numerical addresses (IP), through a system that the expert compares to the address book of a telephone.

Hard blow for Facebook: the former IT engineer of the social network speaks (confesses)

Facebook “understands that if they change the algorithm to be safer, people will spend less time on the site, click fewer ads and earn less” – Facebook has put “profits above safety” of the public. The words of mole Frances Haugen, the former employee who plunged Zuckerberg’s company into its deepest crisis since Cambridge Analytics, are potentially devastating. In an interview with ’60 Minutes’ on CBS, she tells that she too presented complaints to the Sec, the American Consob, in which she accuses the social network of having hidden her research and her studies from investors and the public. The 37-year-old, brave and very knowledgeable. she is also the key source for the Wall Street Journal’s Facebook Files project. She has worked for several social networks, but on Facebook she found the situation “worst”.
Who is Frances Haugen the mole

But what did Haugen say about so explosive?

“I have repeatedly seen conflicts of interest between what was good for the public and what was good for Facebook. And each time Facebook chose what was best for its own profits,” explains Frances Haugen, who explains why she decided to become a ‘mole’ and denounce the company. Haugen is the one who provided the Wall Street Journal in recent months with internal documents that showed a hitherto unknown insight into Facebook.

“There was a security plan” and controls on hate messages and disinformation that appeared on Facebook, but “after the 2020 presidential election something has changed,” revealed Haugen, a Harvard graduate, hired in 2019 as a data engineer. The algorithms would change and the system would become “less secure”. From that moment – again according to Haugen’s version – the social platform allegedly loosened the censorship of hate messages and the contents that misinformed about the electoral result, eventually favoring the dissemination of messages on alleged fraud.

Haugen came out, showing her face and drawing a disturbing picture. Today he will be in Congress for a deposition. “They thought that if they changed the algorithms to make the system more secure, people would spend less time on social media, they would click ads less,” and Facebook “would make less money,” he said. said the former employee. “They always preferred her – she added her – profit over security.”

Haugen said she decided to wage this battle because she lost a loved one to conspiracy theories circulating on social media. She was very clear in her former employer’s assessment of her. “There were conflicts of interest between what was good for the audience and what was good for Facebook,” she said. “Facebook has chosen over and over to optimize for their own interests, how to make more money.”
The impact of Instagram on teenagers

On Instagram, the engineer argued that it has a dramatic impact on the lives of teenagers: “A research carried out by Facebook – he said – says that the young women who follow content related to eating disorder, the more they follow these issues, the more they become depressed. . And this leads to using Instagram more. “

In a written note, Facebook defended itself by arguing that the company “continues to make significant improvements to counter the spread of misinformation and content that can harm people. Claiming that we encourage bad content and do nothing to stop it is not true.”

4october ’21: WhatsApp, Facebook e Instagram down

WhatsApp, Facebook and Instagram down Today 4 October 2021 all the major social platforms of WhatsApp, Facebook and Instagram seem to have serious problems in completing all the classic online uploading operations of the fundamental elements such as images or videos. There are tens of thousands of reports that are arriving. The problems seem to affect all three of Mark Zuckerberg’s platforms from the inability to send or receive multimedia messages on WhatsApp, to the inability to upload images or stories to Instagram. Obviously, on Twitter, the tide of messages from those wondering why this is happening immediately started, and many ironize about the malfunction just as usually happens in these cases since those who always use WhatsApp, Facebook and Instagram, open Twitter only if the first two don’t work. From the two social networks for the moment no news, no comments or explanations on what is happening

Hyper interactivity limits us to an apparently large world

illustration of Pawel Kuczynski

Our devices are a powerful means with which to interact with a vast world and seemingly full of possibilities. But when everyone in a world has the same tools (smartphones, tablets and computers) not only is it difficult to prevail – or to be autonomous from certain mechanisms – but it is also illusory to believe that we are in a world full of freedom. Our devices often immobilize us and do not make us fully live our moments. The drawing above is very evident and probably reflects this concept to the maximum because it illustrates the time of year we probably care the most: summer

Facebook ed Instagram down

At around 9:00 am (now New York), problems were reported on facebook and instragram. Many users have complained about the visualization of images. It seems a shadow of a doubt the cause of the problem is on the fateful day: today, in fact, being the day of thanks, the facebook and instagram servers are stressed and clogged with intense web traffic.

Security problem for facebook: 489 million mobile phone numbers online

facebook

A new security problem for Facebook has been revealed at this time. This time the mobile numbers of users of the social network were affected; they were put online due to a baffling and inexplicable lack of attention in the management of the database that contained them.

Furthermore, something even more serious was discovered: that the database was not protected by any password, leaving the information available to anyone who knew how to recover them.

The figures of the numbers are impressive: according to the report there is talk of as many as 419 million telephone numbers connected to Facebook user accounts and easily accessible to anyone. Of the more than 400 million data, 133 million were US users.

However mobile phone numbers were not directly associated with name and surname but only with an identification number, with which it is difficult to trace the user’s first and last name.