11th November: Saint Martin’s Day

Martin of Tours (Latin: Sanctus Martinus Turonensis; 316 – 8 November 397) was the third bishop of Tours. He has become one of the most familiar and recognizable Christian saints in France, heralded as the patron saint of the Third Republic, and is patron saint of many communities and organizations across Europe. A native of Pannonia (in modern central Europe), he converted to Christianity at a young age. He served in the Roman cavalry in Gaul, but left military service at some point prior to 361, when he became a disciple of Hilary of Poitiers, establishing the monastery at Ligugé. He was consecrated as Bishop of Caesarodunum (Tours) in 371. As bishop, he was active in the suppression of the remnants of Gallo-Roman religion, but he opposed the violent persecution of the Priscillianist sect of ascetics.

The tradition of cutting the cloak
San Martino shares his precious cloak with a poor man, detail of the facade of the Cathedral of Lucca dedicated to the saint

As a circitor, his job was the night patrol and the inspection of the guard posts, as well as the night surveillance of the garrisons. During one of these patrols, the episode took place that changed his life (and which is still today the one most remembered and most used by iconography). In the harsh winter of 335 Martino met a half-naked beggar. Seeing him in pain, he cut his military cloak (the white chlamys of the imperial guard) in two and shared it with the beggar.

The following night he saw in a dream Jesus dressed in half of his military cloak. He heard Jesus say to his angels: “Here is Martin, the Roman soldier who is not baptized, he has clothed me.” When Martin woke up his cloak was intact. The miraculous cloak was kept as a relic and became part of the relic collection of the Merovingian kings of the Franks. The medieval Latin term for “short mantle”, chapel, was extended to the people in charge of keeping the mantle of St. Martin, the chaplains, and from these it was applied to the royal oratory, which was not a church, called a chapel.

In Italy the cult of the saint is linked to the so-called summer of San Martino which manifests itself, in a meteorological sense, at the beginning of November and gives rise to some traditional popular festivals. In the Abruzzo municipality of Scanno, for example, large fires called “glories of San Martino” are lit in honor of San Martino and the districts compete against each other who makes the highest and most durable fire

2nd November (2021): All Souls’ Day

All Souls’ Day, also known as the Commemoration of All the Faithful Departed and the Day of the Dead, is a day of prayer and remembrance for the faithfully departed, which is observed by Roman Catholics and other Christian denominations annually on November 2. All Souls’ Day is often celebrated in Western Christianity; Saturday of Souls is a related tradition more frequently observed in Eastern Christianity. Practitioners of All Souls’ Day traditions often remember deceased loved ones in various ways on the day. Through prayer, intercessions, alms and visits to cemeteries, people commemorate the poor souls in purgatory and gain them indulgences. Beliefs and practices associated with All Souls’ Day vary widely among Christian denominations.

The annual celebration is the last day of Allhallowtide, after All Saints’ Day and its eve.[5] Prior to the standardization of Catholic observance on 2 November by St. Odlio of Cluny during the 10th century, many Catholic congregations celebrated All Souls Day on various dates during the Easter season as it is still observed in some Eastern Orthodox Churches and associated Eastern Catholic and Eastern Lutheran churches. Churches of the East Syriac Rite (Syro-Malabar Catholic Church, Chaldean Catholic Church, Assyrian Church of the East, Ancient Church of the East) commemorate all the faithful departed on the Friday before Lent.

Yom Kippur and Sukkòt, the Jewish world in celebration and prayer

«The Jewish calendar is luni-solar: holidays, days, months and years are based on the time taken by the moon for its revolution around the Earth, the seasons on the time taken by the Earth for its orbit around the Sun. Lunar and solar year differ by about ten days. To recover them, some embolistic years were created, with 13 and not 12 months »

Today, September 16, the 10th of the month of Tishri, Yom Kippur is celebrated, the holiest and most solemn day in the Jewish calendar.

A day entirely dedicated to prayer and penance and which “wants the Jew, aware of his sins, to ask the Lord for forgiveness”. It is the day when according to tradition: “God seals his judgment on the individual”. «[…] Before Kippur the moral and material debts that one has towards other men must have been paid. One must personally ask forgiveness from those who are offended: God for transgressions committed against him, while those committed against other men must be compensated and healed “, reads the website of the Union of Italian Jewish Communities (Ucei) .

Starting from 20 September it will be the Sukkòt Festival, also known as the “Feast of the huts”.

It is precisely the huts that characterize this joyful anniversary that recalls the stay of the Jews in the desert after the liberation from slavery from Egypt: forty years in which they lived in precarious homes, accompanied however, according to tradition, by “clouds of glory”.

Thanksgiving Day

thanks

The day of thanksgiving began, as every year, with the parade in Manhattan with balloons of various parsonages, including snoopy in an astronaut version.

High winds have been blowing through New York City, and the balloons generally aren’t supposed to be flown when sustained winds exceed 23 mph and gusts exceed 34 mph, according to city regulations.
Sustained wind speed in New York is expected to be around 20 mph, and gusts could reach around 40 mph, according to the National Weather Service.

But this year the bad weather seems to ruin Thanksgiving weekend.

In fact, the deep oceanic depression arriving on the western United States will move right from next Thursday on the central US areas, shifting to the north-eastern areas by Monday, ruining the long weekend practically on almost all the US territory.

Day off for Wall Street, which today will be closed for the national Thanksgiving holiday. Trading will resume tomorrow with a reduced timetable. The New York Stock Exchange, Friday, November 29, 2019, will end the session at 1 pm local time (6 pm in England) instead of at the usual time of 4 pm (9 pm in England).