18th May (’22): International Museum Day

International Museum Day (IMD) is an international day held annually on or around 18 May, coordinated by the International Council of Museums (ICOM). The event highlights a specific theme which changes every year reflecting a relevant theme or issue facing museums internationally.

IMD provides the opportunity for museum professionals to meet the public and alert them as to the challenges that museums face, and raise public awareness on the role museums play in the development of society. It also promotes dialogue between museum professionals.

The first International Museum Day took place in 1977, coordinated by ICOM. IMD was established following the adoption of a resolution by ICOM to create an annual event “with the aim of further unifying the creative aspirations and efforts of museums and drawing the attention of the world public to their activity.

Each year, museum internationally are invited to participate in IMD to promote the role of museums around in the world. They do so through events and activities related to the annual theme. An annual theme for the event was first adopted in 1992. An international poster from ICOM was first developed in 1997, and in that year was adapted by 28 countries. In 2009, IMD attracted the participation of 20,000 museums hosting events in more than 90 countries. In 2010, 98 countries participated in the celebration, with 100 countries in 2011, and 30,000 museums in 129 countries in 2012. In 2011, the official IMD poster was translated into 37 languages. By 2014, 35,000 museums from 140 countries were taking part in IMD.

Twitter and Elon Musk’s ambitions

Elon Musk has unveiled his ambitious plans for Twitter, all aimed at supporting the goal of raising the company’s subscription revenue to $ 10 billion by 2028, or doubling the $ 5 billion in subscriptions raised by the social network. of microbolgging over the past year.

The information was gleaned from the New York Times which got to see a presentation Musk shared with investors. Among the first actions taken by Musk will be those aimed at triggering a growth in subscribers to Twitter Blue up to 69 million users by 2025, to reach 159 million by 2028. Twitter Blue, we remember, is a subscription plan at a cost of $ 2.99 a month, it offers access to an “unsubscribe” button, allows you to customize the app, read content without advertising and other features not available to non-subscribers.

The new owner of Twitter also expects particularly robust growth in Twitter users overall, which would rise from the current 217 million to 600 million in 2025 and to 931 million in 2028. Musk’s plans would also include another subscription service, called “X” which could garner 9 million subscribers in 2023 and 104 million by 2028.

All of these actions should therefore help push subscription revenue to $ 10 billion by 2028, where Musk’s projected overall revenue could reach $ 26.4 billion. Such as? According to information gathered by the Times, it would be mostly advertising revenue with Musk expecting an advertising revenue of $ 12 billion by 2028.

There would also be the desire to raise up to 1.3 billion dollars by 2028 from unspecified “payment activities”: in this sense, however, it is possible that some kind of synergy with PayPal, of which Musk is one, may be grafted. of the co-founders.

Finally, another revenue stream could be represented by the sale of tweets to third-party companies that analyze data and information to outline market trends and audience preferences. Last year, Twitter raised $ 572 million for data licensing. However, it is not clear how Musk intends to carry out this type of business, which could require a heavy revision of the terms of service.

Finally, there is talk of hiring, with plans to create up to 3600 more jobs. Elon Musk has set himself the goal of having more than 11,000 employees by 2025, which will be fundamental for building new services and user experiences.

9th May (’22): Victory Day (Russia and many eastern countries)

Victory Day] is a holiday that commemorates the victory over Nazi Germany in 1945. It was first inaugurated in the 15 republics of the Soviet Union, following the signing of the German Instrument of Surrender late in the evening on 8 May 1945 (after midnight, thus on 9 May Moscow Time). The Soviet government announced the victory early on 9 May after the signing ceremony in Berlin. Although the official inauguration occurred in 1945, the holiday became a non-labor day only in 1965, and only in certain Soviet republics.

In East Germany, 8 May was observed as Liberation Day from 1950 to 1966, and was celebrated again on the 40th anniversary in 1985. In 1967, a Soviet-style “Victory Day” was celebrated on 8 May. Since 2002, the German state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern has observed a commemoration day known as the Day of Liberation from National Socialism, and the End of the Second World War.

The Russian Federation has officially recognized 9 May since its formation in 1991 and considers it a non-working holiday even if it falls on a weekend (in which case any following Monday will be a non-working holiday). The holiday was similarly celebrated there while the country was part of the Soviet Union. Most other countries in Europe observe Victory in Europe Day (often abbreviated to VE Day, or V-E Day), 8 May, as a national remembrance or victory day.

9th May (’22): Europe Day

Europe Day is a day celebrating “peace and unity in Europe” celebrated on 5 May by the Council of Europe and on 9 May by the European Union.

The first recognition of Europe Day was by the Council of Europe, introduced in 1964. The European Union later started to celebrate its own European Day in commemoration of the 1950 Schuman Declaration, leading it to be referred to by some as “Schuman Day” or “Day of the united Europe”. Both days are celebrated by displaying the Flag of Europe.

The Council of Europe was founded on 5 May 1949, and hence it chose that day for its celebrations when it established the holiday in 1964.

The “Europe Day” of the EU was introduced in 1985 by the European Communities (the predecessor organisation of the EU). The date commemorates the Schuman Declaration of 9 May 1950, put forward by Robert Schuman, which proposed the pooling of French and West German coal and steel industries. This led to the creation of the European Coal and Steel Community, the first European Community, established on 18 April 1951.

A “raft of cultural icons” was launched by the European Commission in 1985, in reaction to the report by the ad hoc commission “for a People’s Europe” chaired by Pietro Adonnino. The aim was to facilitate European integration by fostering a Pan-European identity among the populations of the EC member states. The European Council adopted “Europe Day” along with the flag of Europe and other items on 29 June 1985, in Milan.

Following the foundation of the European Union in 1993, observance of Europe Day by national and regional authorities increased significantly. Germany in particular has gone beyond celebrating just the day, since 1995 extending the observance to an entire “Europe Week” (Europawoche ) centered on 9 May. In Poland, the Schuman Foundation, a Polish organisation advocating European integration established in 1991, first organised its Warsaw Schuman Parade on Europe Day 1999, at the time advocating the accession of Poland to the EU.

Observance of 9 May as “Europe Day” was reported “across Europe” as of 2008. In 2019, 9 May became an official public holiday in Luxembourg each year, to mark Europe Day. The EU’s choice of the date of foundation of the European Coal and Steel Community rather than that of the EU itself established a narrative in which Schuman’s speech, concerned with inducing economic growth and cementing peace between France and Germany, is presented as anticipating a “vocation of the European Union to be the main institutional framework” for the much further-reaching European integration of later decades.

The European Constitution would have legally enshrined all the European symbols in the EU treaties, however the treaty failed to be ratified in 2005, and usage would continue only in the present de facto manner. The Constitution’s replacement, the Treaty of Lisbon, contains a declaration by sixteen members supporting the symbols. The European Parliament “formally recognised” Europe Day in October 2008.

World Red Cross and Red Crescent Day

World Red Cross and Red Crescent Day is an annual celebration of the principles of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement. World Red Cross Red Crescent Day is celebrated on 8 May each year. This date is the anniversary of the birth of Jean-Henry Dunant, who was born on 8 May 1828. He was the founder of International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and the recipient of the first Nobel Peace Prize.


The idea for an “annual action that could take hold in the whole world … that would be a major contribution to peace” was introduced just after World War I. This initiative, known as the “Red Cross Truce”, was studied by an International Commission established at the 14th International Conference of the Red Cross. Its report, presented to the 15th International Conference of the Red Cross in Tokyo in 1934, was approved. It was only after World War II, in 1946, that the Tokyo proposal was studied by the League of Red Cross Societies (LRCS), renamed the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) in 1991. Two years later, having considered the principles of the truce and its applicability across different regions of the world, the proposal of an annual International Red Cross Day was adopted and the first Red Cross Day was celebrated on 8 May 1948. The official title of the day changed over time, and became “World Red Cross and Red Crescent Day” in 1984.

The Chinese government abandons Windows and “Western” PCs: space for Linux

Over the next two years China will take care of nearly 50 million PCs used in government agencies with “non-foreigners” that can be maintained nationwide. This also involves the abandonment of Windows in favor of Linux, to an extent aimed at cutting any possible dependence on US realities for everything related to the operation of the state machine.

This is a measure that actually comes “from afar”, with the Chinese government over the last decade trying to encourage the adoption of local hardware and software as much as possible, including hiring a company to monitor local suppliers in the development of sensitive components and services for the operation of government information systems.

A move that could have quite severe effects on the reality as Dell and HP, for which the supply and assistance of a government reality is an important part of their turnover. Conversely, Lenovo could have the opportunity to snatch significant market share from US competitors.

However, there are some components that are fundamental for certain purposes and for which there is still no “made in China” alternative. Chinese PC system manufacturers will still rely on Western components – for example, processors and GPUs – to be able to build their machines.

It is similar that special permits will continue to exist for some specific categories, such as state media and cybersecurity agencies, because they can continue to source foreign technology, even if there is no real future in the future for a squeeze for these particular cases as well.