NASA is testing a flying taxi: the future of mobility is taking shape.

NASA has started flight tests on an electric eVTOL built by Aviation and intended for the rapid transport of people. The air taxi allows NASA to collect data on performance and acoustics to help the sector evolve, but not only: what has been learned will serve to fill any gaps in the regulations written by the FAA. by Manolo De Agostini published on 03 September 2021, at 15:01 in the Science and technology channel NASA NASA “studies” the so-called “flying cars”. The US Space Agency has started flight tests with Joby Aviation’s eVTOL (acronym Electric Vertical Takeoff and Landing), a flight powered entirely by electricity and capable of getting up and landing vertically. The initiative, part of the National Advanced Air Mobility (AAM) campaign, will run until Friday 10 September at the Joby Electric Flight Base located near Big Sur, California. It is the first time that NASA has tested an eVTOL, an aircraft that many could act as an air taxi for those in the cities and surrounding areas, adding another way of moving people and goods than traditional ones. NASA’s goal is to collect vehicle performance and acoustics data (via more than 50 microphones to monitor different flight phases) for use in modeling and simulating future concepts. The test will help identify gaps in FAA (Feal Aviation Administration) regulations and policies so that eVTOLs can become an integral part of future mobility. One of their strengths, in addition to reducing pollution, should in fact be the acoustic profile: being ideally less noisy than helicopters, they could be more suitable for flights in densely populated areas. NASA’s experiments will serve as a preamble to a test phase, known as NC-1, scheduled for 2022, with more complex flight scenarios and also carried out with other aircraft. In short, NASA’s job is to act as a consultant to the FAA to arrive at clear and safe regulations. According to some experts it will take five years or more to see an eVTOL fly in the American skies, while Joby is more optimistic and is aiming to launch an air taxi service in 2024. Joby Aviation went public a few weeks ago on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), after ten years of activity and a business that has yet to go live but which, as soon as it starts, could soon become a multi-billionaire again.

♬ Twenty One Pilots – Saturday

LYRIC

Slow down on Monday
Not a sound on Wednesday (yeah)
Might get loud (ayy) on Friday
But on Saturday, Saturday, Saturday
We paint the townLose my sense a time or two
Weeks feel like days
Medicate in the afternoon
And I just want to know
Have you lost your footing, too?
I just pray that I’m not losing youCatch me floating circles in my fishbowl
Keep things fresh
She said that I should change my clothes
I exaggerate the life we used to know, oh, ohSlow down on Monday
Not a sound on Wednesday (yeah)
Might get loud (ayy) on Friday
But on Saturday, Saturday, Saturday
We paint the townOoh, you’re good
These are my dancing shoes
We paint the town
Ooh, you’re good
Thought I would dance with you
Might get loud (ayy) on Friday
But on Saturday, Saturday, Saturday
We paint the townLife moves slow on the ocean floor (feeling great)
I can’t feel the waves anymore
Did the tide forget to move?
I just pray that I’m not losing youCatch me floating circles in my fishbowl
Keep things fresh
She said that I should change my clothes
I exaggerate the life we used to know, oh, yeahWorking on music?
Yeah
I’ll just to go to bed, I’m tired
I wanna watch “Friends” with you
Oh, if you feel like you have time to do a song or you’re inspired
You should just go for itNot a sound on Wednesday
Might get loud (ayy) on Friday
But on Saturday, Saturday, Saturday
We paint the townWe paint, paint
Might get loud on Friday
But on Saturday, Saturday, Saturday

Volkswagen: from 2030 there will be no more cars with manual trasmission

Some car manufacturers are considering removing the clutch pedal from their cars in advance of the transition to electric mobility. It appears that Volkswagen is one of the first automakers to abandon manual transmission, according to a report by the German website Auto Motor und Sport. Upcoming Volkswagen cars with automatic transmission only After the disbursements that the Wolfsburg company had to support in the aftermath of the Dieselgate and to finance the electrification process, it is also necessary to simplify the current cars in order to reduce costs. For these reasons, Volkswagen is giving priority to the manual gearbox and should give up the clutch pedal starting with the cars that will enter the market in 2023. Volkswagen In particular, it seems to be the new Tiguan compact crossover arriving in 2023 and the new Passat, vehicles with traditional endothermic power but which will be launched exclusively in versions with automatic transmission. Auto Motor und Sport believes manual transmission in a VW will no longer exist by the end of the decade, when the company’s range could be entirely electric vehicles. In all likelihood, these VW decisions will also impact brands related to the group, such as Skoda, SEAT and Audi. Among other things, the latter had already announced its intention to launch only electric vehicles starting in 2026. Another news that confirms how the car market is going through a process of profound transformation, where investments by car manufacturers are focused on different aspects than those on which we focused more in the past.

Google Doodle celebrated the 138th birthday of typhus vaccine creator Rudolf Weigl – Technology News, Firstpost

Today Google Doodle celebrates the 138th birthday of Polish inventor, physician and immunologist Rudolf Weigl. He is known as the creator of the first effective vaccine against it 7; typhus epidemic. There are three types of typhus: exfoliating typhus, mouse typhus, and epidemic typhus. It is a group of diseases caused by bacteria that spread fleas, lice and fleas.

Each insect spreads a type of typhus: chicks spread typhus patchy, fleas spread mouse typhus, and body lice spread epidemic typhus. According to the US CDC, epidemic typhus was the cause of death for millions of people in previous centuries, but today it is very rare. When cases occur, it is observed in areas of extreme overcrowding, where body lice can easily pass from one person to another. Born in 1883, Weigl was born in what is now the Czech Republic as the son of Austro-German parents. His father died in a bicycle accident and his mother remarried a Polish high school teacher.

In 1907 he completed his studies in biology at the Polish University of Lwów and then obtained a doctorate in zoology, comparative anatomy and histology. Typhus was a big problem during World War I, and Weigl has been studying lice in his lab for decades and has been able to develop a vaccine from these small insects. After Charles Nicolle’s preliminary work in 1909 (he discovered that lice were the vector of epidemic typhus), Weigl began work on a vaccine against epidemic typhus. To develop the vaccine, he bred the lice that Rickettsia prowazeki had been infected with and then crushed into a vaccine paste. He used this paste for experiments on animals and also performed some experiments on humans.

Weigl was successful in 1936 and vaccinated its first beneficiary. During the Soviet occupation he headed the Department of General Biology at Lviv University and worked on the development of this vaccine. The Typhus Research Institute was founded in his department. It maintained its position during the occupation as its research was particularly important as typhus spread mainly in Eastern Europe

The social (and economic) policy of wars

Almost all wars are waged for interests, particularly political, social and geographical ones. But often there are also economic interests. The United States has always been criticated of waging war for economic gains. There is no doubt that almost all American wars have been waged to export democracy or even to suppress dictatorships. But behind these valid reasons there were also other interests, often not directly … but there were. After all, successful wars, in most cases, bring money.